Brighton Museum & Art Gallery

Postcard showing Brighton Museum & Art Gallery, 1907.

Brighton Museum opened in 1873 as a new purpose-built museum next to the former stable complex of the Royal Pavilion. The original entrance was here in Church Street. As part of the museum redevelopment in 2001, the entrance was moved to the Royal Pavilion garden.

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Shoreham Airport

Postcard of the Avro sheds at Shoreham Airadrome Cerca 1914

Shoreham airport is built on a salt marsh 6 miles west of Brighton and 5 miles east of Worthing. It is the oldest licensed airport in the United Kingdom, with its opening taking place on 20th June 1911. The location was chosen as the sight offered easy transport to and from London and the continent, its location would also appeal to sightseers. Avro (aircraft manufacture) moved its flight school from Brooklands in surrey to Shoreham in October 1912 and it occupied several of the six to ten hangars (or sheds as they where known prior to World War One)which had been built alongside a grandstand for the Circuit of Europe and Round Britain Air Races in 1911.

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Portslade Brewery

 

A tinted monochrome photographic postcard of Portslade Brewery, circa 1905.

Beer has been made in Portslade since at least 1789. The large scale brewery pictured in this postcard was founded in 1849 by John Dudney. In 1884 the Dudney family sold the brewery to two brothers, Walter and Herbert Mews, at the price of £17,000.

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Chattri War Memorial

Photograph of the dedication of the Chattri in February 1921.

The Chattri marks the spot where 53 Sikh and Hindu patients who died in Brighton’s Indian WW1 military hospitals were cremated. The memorial was the brainchild of John Otter, the former Mayor of Brighton who encouraged the use of the Royal Pavilion as an Indian hospital.

The Chattri was designed by E. C. Henriques with Sir Samuel Swinton Jacob overseeing the project. The marble for its construction was obtained from Sicily and a Manchester-based construction company was tasked with building it.

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Old Shoreham Bridge

Oil painting of Old Shoreham Bridge circa 1904 by William H. Bond.

Construction on the Shoreham bridge started in 1781, with its opening to public traffic during March the next year. The bridge spans the River Adur tidal estuary and connects Shoreham by Sea to Lancing. Before its construction, a raft was used to cross the estuary around its location (the alternative crossing being in Bramber).

In 1861 the bridge was brought by the London Brighton and South Coast Railway who charged a 6d toll on the eastern bank of the estuary, the equivalent of £6.96 today.

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Preston Road 

Photograph of Preston Road, late 19th century.

The London Road Viaduct we can see here was designed by railway engineer John Urpeth Rastrick. Completed in 1841, it curves across the valley that runs north from Brighton. It consists of 26 arches and is about 360 metres long.

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St Andrew’s Church, Waterloo Street

Photograph of St Andrew’s Church, c1890.

Consecrated in July 1828, St Andrew’s Church was inspired by 15th century Italian architecture. The style is know as Italian Quattrocento revival, and this church was the first example in England.

It was designed by Sir Charles Barry, an architect who built several buildings in Brighton. These include St Peter’s Church in Brighton, and what is now known as the Barry Building in the Royal Sussex County Hospital.  He later became the principal architect for the rebuilding of the Houses of Parliament.

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Waterhall Mill

Magic lantern slide showing Waterhall Mill, also known as Patcham Windmill.

Waterhall Mill was built in 1885. It is said to be the last working windmill built in Sussex, and remained in use until 1924.

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Brighton Aquarium

Photograph of the redevelopment of Brighton Aquarium, 1928.

Brighton Aquarium first opened in 1872. It was deisgned by Eugenius Birch, who also designed the West Pier.

Although initially popular, by the turn of the century it was running into financial difficulty. Brighton Corporation, the local authority of the day, bought the Aquarium in 1901.

In 1927 the Corporation decided to modernise the building. A new design was drawn up by Borough Engineer David Edwards to remodel the building replacing many of the features of Birch’s original design.

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St. John’s Church

Postcard of St. John’s Church in Hove, c1904

When St John’s Church was planned in the 1840s it was going to be called St Saviour’s. However, when it was brought to the attention of the church’s protestant founders to be built church that the name was a corruption of St Francis Xavier, a catholic saint, the name was changed to St John the Baptist’s Church.

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